Blaming social media is a cop-out

When problems and major issues arise, it is easy to blame something or someone that is around, but not necessarily present. Social media receives too much blame for the problems in the world today.

St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCullough put the media under fire during his press conference, and social media did not take too kindly to him. (Photo via KSDK.)
St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCullough put the media under fire during his press conference, and social media did not take too kindly to him. (Photo via KSDK.)

St. Louis County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch attacked the media and “non-stop” social media during his 25 minute press conference Monday where he announced police officer Darren Wilson, who has since resigned, will not be tried for the death of Michael Brown.

Mr. McCulloch, how is it that you can attack outside sources if you and the jury can rule that there is no reason to even put Wilson on trial for Brown’s death? Obviously social media did not play that big of an impact, on you or the jury, for any action can occur. I respect the law, and respect this ruling, but blaming social media is unacceptable.