U.S. Supreme Court takes on social media

Due to a recent case that involved a man serving nearly three years in prison for posting threats about his ex-wife on Facebook, the U.S. Supreme Court took a deeper look Monday into the threats posted through social media, and whether they hinge on First Amendment rights.

Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan is one of the justices who feels the standards that may be set  on social media threats are too low.
Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan is one of the justices who feels the standards that may be set on social media threats are too low.

Several of the justices could not agree to how far you can go to put a person in prison for those threats as you may not know what a person is going through mentally.

Advertisements

Don’t speak up: parents are silenced in fears of social media backlash of their children

Bullying is still a major roadblock to get through in social media use, and parents near a recent sexual abuse case feel like they are forced to chose between their child’s physical safety, and their virtual safety.

A former teacher at West Salem High School in Salem, Oregon, was sentenced to 38 months in prison for sexual abuse. Parents, in fear of retribution on their children, are afraid to speak out. (Photo courtesy of the Statesman Journal)
A former teacher at West Salem High School in Salem, Oregon, was sentenced to 38 months in prison for sexual abuse. Parents, in fear of retribution on their children, are afraid to speak out. (Photo courtesy of the Statesman Journal)

Among the things parents are afraid of according to the article include their child getting their playing time reduced by other coaches, and students and parents lashing out against the student on social media for snitching on the coach which affects the academic programs.